You are here

2200 Block of St. James Street

-A A +A
c. 1870–1878, Frank Furness and others

This street is a display case of Philadelphia's High Victorian architecture—and materials, too, ranging from brick and marble to sandstone and serpentinite. Except perhaps for the house of Charles Stille, the University of Pennsylvania's provost, at number 2201, the entire north side was evidently designed by Furness and Hewitt before 1874. Across the street, at its west end, is a splendid row of Venetian Gothic houses. Finally, the Morton P. Henry house at number 2200 has all the hallmarks of an early, brutally reductivist Furness design: a sharply defined groove up the front marks the internal spatial subdivision of corridor and rooms, anticipating architect Louis Kahn's dichotomy of served and servant space.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

George E. Thomas, "2200 Block of St. James Street", [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-PH99.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 105-105.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,