You are here

Four-Unit Mill Housing

-A A +A
1851–1862. 1742–1748 Lonsdale Ave. and 9–11 Cook St.

Downhill from the joyous image of the Magoun House, a grimmer cluster: four-unit brick housing, built in the severe brick and granite mode of the factories. It typifies quarters built by the Lonsdale Company for its predominantly Irish, English, and Scottish work force here as well as in Berkeley and Ashton. But to those who came from housing of this kind in the English Midlands, these may have seemed at the time to be model quarters in having more space and more modern equipment than their British equivalents, as well as in the provision for a modicum of greenery in company-maintained lawns with trees bordering the street (the typical Midlands village had none). Here each family has its own narrow two-and-one-half-story slice through the housing block. The middle units are entered from two doors toward the center of the front elevation, with dormers to light the attic, while the outer units have entrances at the ends of the buildings and attic windows in the gable ends.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Four-Unit Mill Housing", [Lincoln, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-LI5.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 191-192.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,