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J. J. Van Alen House (Wakehurst)

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Wakehurst
1884–1888, Dudley Newton from plans by C. E. Kempe. Ochre Point Ave.

Wakehurst, which simulates an English Tudor manor house in its elevation and detailing, was built under the supervision of Dudley Newton from designs purchased by J. J. Van Alen from the British architect C. E. Kempe. Set back from the street and screened by a stand of trees, the horizontal mass of the house is treated sculpturally as a set of two-and-one-half-story staggered blocks, each of which terminates in a gabled end or dormer. Although the composition is remarkably restrained in its carved decoration, each elevation displays a lively sense of modeling, from the recurrent grid of window sets to the finials tracing the zigzag roofline. The central entrance leads to a wood-paneled hall running across the entry axis with the main staircase set before the visitor in keeping with English antecedents.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "J. J. Van Alen House (Wakehurst)", [Newport, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-NE137.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 560-560.

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