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Bungalow

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c. 1905. 95 Olney St.

The best of a group of bungalows that gave the area its onetime artistic reputation originally belonged to the locally prominent artist H. Cyrus Farnum. The long pitch of the roof to the front, with its trapdoor dormer, shelters a deep porch, columned to acknowledge the Colonial Revival. But note especially the subtlety of the side profile, where the expected gable is gentled by the double pitch of its rear slope. Such double pitches nicely abstract the qualities of an “olden” sag and (when to the rear) invoke the ancient custom of a saltbox addition. The sagging roof profile accords as well with the tapered chimney. The chimney slices into the roof plane rather than penetrating through it. Paint now intensifies the Neo-Colonial aura, although originally the shingled walls and chimney brick may have shown their natural colors and textures, with trim and columns only in white.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Bungalow", [Providence, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-NP2.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 163-163.

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