You are here

Apartments (Richard Arnold–Pelog Arnold Tavern)

-A A +A
Richard Arnold–Pelog Arnold Tavern
1690; late 18th century. 4 Woonsocket Hill Rd. (southeast corner of Great Rd.)

The south end of this structure was the 20-by-20-foot Richard Arnold, Jr., House, which was the beginning of the village and of English settlement in the Woonsocket area. It was extended to its present size at the end of the eighteenth century by the patriot Pelog Arnold, who operated the house as an inn. He used its tavern as a recruitment center and depository for arms during the Revolution. Pelog Arnold rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel, served as a delegate to the Continental Congress, and eventually became chief justice successively of the Rhode Island Superior Court and Supreme Court. The building remained a tavern into the twentieth century, until its conversion into apartments.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Apartments (Richard Arnold–Pelog Arnold Tavern)", [North Smithfield, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-NS5.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 241-241.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,