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Samuel Clark Farm

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c. 1680, house; 20th century, ell addition. 19th century, barn, other outbuildings, and one-room schoolhouse. 106 Lewiston Ave. (pole 699)
  • Samuel Clark Farm

This spreading, one-and-one-half-story house with a gambrel roof and a central chimney in stone (more typical of Connecticut than Rhode Island) is sited down a long slope. Outbuildings and the culminating Victorian barn take precedence close to the road, with smaller outbuildings in a random linear arrangement down to the house. This is an exceptionally complete (and in some ways unique) cluster of farm buildings, handsomely maintained on a splendid site with walled fields all around. The complex includes a raised corncrib, a machine shop, a private one-room schoolhouse, and miscellaneous sheds. Two stepped shed-roofed adjuncts to the barn fit into a slope at right angles to the broad, tilted plane that holds the farm.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Samuel Clark Farm", [Richmond, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-RI1.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 425-425.

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