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Mill Duplexes

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c. 1825. 316–322 Mountaindale Rd.

In 1825 near what is now the intersection of Mountaindale Road and Pleasant View Avenue, Thomas Sprague built a cotton mill on family property, naming the place Spragueville. Neither his stone mill (destroyed in the early twentieth century) nor much of the village still exists, although the vicinity, renamed by subsequent owners, has returned to its original designation. Of interest only are two clapboard workers' duplexes near the corner, the one closest to the corner in the best condition. Mill housing of this antiquity and as well preserved is extremely rare. Both duplexes maintain their tiny trapdoor monitors and paired interior chimneys, and one of them has its original paired doors at the center, with narrow transom lights topped by a molding in common. The delicacy typical of Federal carpentry is apparent even in so plain and utilitarian a structure as this.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Mill Duplexes", [Smithfield, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-SM16.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 255-255.

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