You are here

Stephen Winsor House

-A A +A
Mid-19th century. 113 Austin Ave. (not visible)

One more Winsor property in the area, the Stephen Winsor House. This is a tall house based on an asymmetrical composition of cross gables, giving it a compact L-shape in a carpentered version of the Italianate manner. Its detailing, which is blunt and forceful, consists of a broad, bracketed shelter over the entrance, more bracketing under the projected eaves, and paneled corner boards. Unusual for its style, however, is the use of seemingly Neo-Tudor molding heads, which typically fold around the tops of windows and doors, but are here lifted above the windows around their lintels. (Or perhaps the intention was not stylistic allusion, but emphatic framing for the lintels derived from stone building.) Stephen Winsor was a banker who operated his country place as a gentleman's farm. It is still surrounded by the remnants of orchards and stone walls.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Stephen Winsor House", [Smithfield, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-SM8.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 252-252.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,