You are here

Tiverton Historical Society (Chase-Cory House)

-A A +A
Chase-Cory House
c. 1730 and later. 3908 Main Rd.

The Chase-Cory House, another eighteenth-century gambrel, is more intact than its neighbor, but much restored and milder in exterior aspect. Several Chases lived here, then Cornelius Seabury when he first opened his shop in Four Corners. Ledgers from his country store are in the society's collection. Then a member of the Cory family acquired the house in 1816, and it long remained with descendants. Behind it stands a fine early corncrib, moved from another site, raised on stubby stone columns capped with horizontal stones to thwart rodents. Unusually, its walls are shingled above to enclose an upper story with vertical slatting below to provide air for forage. (A similar crib in the field behind the Soule-Seabury House has been restored to resemble this one).

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Tiverton Historical Society (Chase-Cory House)", [Tiverton, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-TI9.4.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 486-486.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,