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Triple-Deckers

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The neighborhood offers more triple-decker variety, beginning with a pair of prim, double-posted, hip-roofed triple-deckers at 330 and 336 Rathbun Street ( WO4.1; c. 1923). On Social Avenue and on Privilege Street are three other treatments within the doubled tripledecker formula (although missing most of the original turned balustering). At 913 Social Street ( WO4.2; c. 1915–1920), fully balustered porches run around an octagonal corner, the upper two at least once also topped by a spindled band. Next door is a standard triple-decker with its stack of (rebuilt) porches in front. Since both also have stacks of porches to the rear, the combined building contains twelve apartments. At 939 Social ( WO4.4; 1915–1920) a six-unit triple decker raised over a rebuilt base for stores shows porches wrapping three walls—front, side and rear—interrupted only by a stair tower centered in a side elevation. Diagonally across the intersection, at 570 Privilege Street ( WO4.4; c. 1895), porches run the width of the broad front and almost half of one of the side elevations, this time retaining a transomlike band of spindling for the top porch. Doors for three units are in front, with three more off the end of the leg of the L for units to the rear.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Triple-Deckers", [Woonsocket, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-WO4.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 225-225.

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