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Museum of Work and Culture (Barnai Worsted Company Dye Works, later Lincoln Textile Corporation)

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Barnai Worsted Company Dye Works, later Lincoln Textile Corporation
1919. 1993–1997, conversion to museum, Christopher Chadbourne Associates. 42 South Main St.

Discussion about such a museum arose during the city's centennial in 1988 and a designer was selected the following year; the economic recession of the early 1990s delayed funding and completion. The museum was originally slated to occupy the picturesque Falls Yarn Mill (see WO39), but as plans evolved the project was moved to this plain brick, flat-roofed, pier-and-spandrel building. A site along the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, the museum organizes exhibitions and programs that focus on Blackstone Valley mill workers and their ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Museum of Work and Culture (Barnai Worsted Company Dye Works, later Lincoln Textile Corporation)", [Woonsocket, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-WO40.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 238-238.

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