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Museum of South Texas (McGill Brothers Building)

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McGill Brothers Building
1941, attributed to Hardy and Curran. 66 S. Wright St.

The most distinctive design on Wright Street, a major north–south artery, this building housed the headquarters for the ranch and oil operations of the McGill family, one of the one hundred and thirty oil-related enterprises in Alice at the time. Modeled after the Texas Centennial Museum of 1936 on the Alamo grounds in San Antonio, the building is attributed to Hardy and Curran, who craftily detailed their Spanish Mediterranean constructions, and who designed a house for Claude McGill in 1936 that still stands at 316 Craig Avenue. The two-story limestone headquarters, inaugurated in 1975 as the Museum of South Texas, has a vaulted, navelike interior with a rear mezzanine that includes the wooden conference table used by the McGill brothers.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Gerald Moorhead et al.
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Citation

Gerald Moorhead et al., "Museum of South Texas (McGill Brothers Building)", [Alice, Texas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/TX-01-KA34.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Texas

Buildings of Texas, Gerald Moorhead and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 267-267.

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