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Commercial Building (Mercedes High School)

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Mercedes High School
1925, Elwing and Mulhausen. 900 S. Ohio Ave.

This textbook example of Mission Revival now functions as office space. The two-story, gabled, gray stucco building, with rounded parapets and prominent tower, serves as the central block for one-story arcaded side wings. Curiously, it was in the same year that this Harlingen-based partnership designed the forward-looking Art Deco Central Elementary School at 316 N. Main Street in the nearby city of Donna.

As the Mercedes school campus grew, buildings were added in contrasting styles, creating no significant public spaces: a neo-Romanesque junior high school (1927) by Elwing and Mulhausen; a neo-Gothic second high school (1931) by R. Newell Waters; and a Spanish Mediterranean, Waters-designed gymnasium (1931) with ornate cast-stone details reminiscent of his Weslaco City Hall.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Gerald Moorhead et al.
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Data

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Citation

Gerald Moorhead et al., "Commercial Building (Mercedes High School)", [Mercedes, Texas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/TX-01-MR20.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Texas

Buildings of Texas, Gerald Moorhead and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 300-300.

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