You are here

Bell County Courthouse

-A A +A
1885, Jasper N. Preston and Son; 1999 rehabilitation, TWC Architects. 101 E. Central Ave.

Imposing in mass and appearance, the Renaissance Revival courthouse is three stories in height and constructed of a golden-hued stone from a local quarry. Buildings around the courthouse square use the same stone, creating a harmonious precinct. The four elevations consist of five elements. The central feature, an entrance pavilion, rises from a one-story base of rusticated stone with a portico above supported by Ionic columns. On each side are flanking bays terminated at each corner by a projecting pavilion. The courthouse is dominated by a central tower, 125 feet high, terminated by a statue of Justice. The tower is supported on a wide base and surrounded by a colonnade with fluted columns and carved capitals. The 1999 rehabilitation reconstructed the tower and roofs that were removed in a remodeling in the 1930s.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Gerald Moorhead et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Gerald Moorhead et al., "Bell County Courthouse", [Belton, Texas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/TX-01-NS27.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Texas

Buildings of Texas, Gerald Moorhead and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 119-119.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,