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Offices (Prince William County Courthouse)

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Prince William County Courthouse
1892–1894, Teague and Marye. c. 1985, conversion. 9248 Lee Ave. (northwest corner of Lee Ave. and Grant St.)

The county seat was moved to Manassas in 1892. The county commissioners rejected a Colonial Revival design and instead selected a vaguely Romanesque Revival–Second Empire confection that in more cosmopolitan centers would have been considered very out of date. The architects, James C. Teague and Philip Thornton Marye, of Norfolk and Newport News, used the parti of Brooks Hall at the University of Virginia but slightly changed the exterior, adding some red sandstone details to a tall, painted red brick box. In front is a Civil War monument commemorating a “Love Feast of the Blues and Grays” that took place in 1911. The county government departed in the mid-1980s, and the building is currently commercial office space.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Richard Guy Wilson et al.
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Citation

Richard Guy Wilson et al., "Offices (Prince William County Courthouse)", [Manassas, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-01-NV40.8.

Print Source

Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont, Richard Guy Wilson and contributors. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 64-65.

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