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William Walker House

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c. 1803, James Walker. 9727 Warren Ferry Rd. (VA 627), Warren

A particularly well-preserved example of small-scale domestic architecture in the Jeffersonian manner, this single-story house, elevated on a high basement, is reminiscent of the central cores of the Palladian villas that Jefferson admired. Although the red brick and pedimented wood portico with a tympanum lunette are characteristic of Jefferson's work, there is no evidence of his direct involvement in the design. A former Jefferson workman, James Walker, built the house for his brother, William. Like many of Palladio's patrons, William Walker was a prominent merchant. The elegant house suited his position in the small village, which was a trading port on the James River. Modifications, added later in the nineteenth century, have been removed. The small brick service wing on the east is a twentieth-century addition.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Richard Guy Wilson et al.
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Citation

Richard Guy Wilson et al., "William Walker House", [Scottsville, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-01-PI35.

Print Source

Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont, Richard Guy Wilson and contributors. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 138-138.

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