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University of Virginia Research Park at North Fork

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1996–present, Duany Plater-Zyberk, planners; Mitchell/Matthews, architects; Gregg Bleam, landscape architect. Lewis and Clark Dr. (U.S. 29, 1.2 miles north of VA 649)

An attempt to create a neotraditional office/research park, this 532-acre site has been laid out by the nationally known firm that designed Seaside in Florida. The intention was a pedestrian-conscious grouping of buildings that harmonize in style, materials, and form and that imitate the downtowns of an earlier day. The project's renderings show tree-lined streets with awnings and shops on the ground floors of buildings and even a steeple. Stylistically the buildings are postmodern Georgian or Jeffersonian Revival. Abundant architectural controls specify the size of brick, the type of bond (Flemish), the size of posts, the thickness of garden walls, and other items. To date only one building has been constructed. Whether this bold vision will be carried out remains to be seen.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Richard Guy Wilson et al.
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Citation

Richard Guy Wilson et al., "University of Virginia Research Park at North Fork", [Charlottesville, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-01-PI47.

Print Source

Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont, Richard Guy Wilson and contributors. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 141-142.

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