You are here

Milburne

-A A +A
1934–1935, William Lawrence Bottomley; Charles Gillette, landscape architect. 315 Lock Ln.

Milburne, commissioned by Ambassador Walter Robertson, is one of four Bottomley houses in Windsor Farms and one of two that are visible from the street. It is sited to overlook the James River, with a gated entrance on axis with a pedimented central block flanked by hyphens and wings. As is typical of Bottomley's work, especially by the 1930s, when he had gained his stride, every detail is carefully studied, and all the proportions are correct. Commonly labeled as suburban James River Georgian Revival in style, the house is largely derived from Palladio. The interior, however, is more Adamesque or Federal Revival in character. The initial landscaping was by Gillette, but Arthur Shurcliff from Colonial Williamsburg worked on the river terrace. Umberto Innocenti of New York designed the wrought iron railing on the retaining wall for the river terrace. The walled garden on the east was the design of Alden Hopkins, also of Colonial Williamsburg.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Richard Guy Wilson et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Richard Guy Wilson et al., "Milburne", [Richmond, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-01-RI336.6.

Print Source

Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont, Richard Guy Wilson and contributors. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 274-275.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,