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Grayson-Gravely House

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c. 1881. North side of VA 613 at Little River Bridge, Graysontown, 6.5 miles south of Radford

One of Southwest Virginia's most fanciful houses, this two-story frame house is situated on a high bank overlooking Little River. Built for Ephraim C. Grayson, a member of the family who settled Graysontown, the house was originally located farther up the hill and was moved to this site after J. H. H. Gravely purchased it in 1889. The sawnwork trim is especially exuberant on the three-story side tower with its open-air second story, around the window above the central entrance porch, and in the gable. The wall above the two second-floor side windows curves up into the roofline. All, or at least most, of the patterned shingles, balusters, brackets, finials, and elaborate semicircular window heads were probably produced at the local Grayson sawmill.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Grayson-Gravely House", [Radford, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-MO37.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 442-442.

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