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Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church

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1840s. 279 Somers Rd.

Mt. Calvary was one of the last meetinghouse-plan churches to be constructed in Page County. The gabled brick church, on a ridgetop overlooking Hawksbill Creek, is distinguished on the exterior by its fine brickwork, water table, and two double-leaf transomed doors. Inside the sanctuary, a gallery supported by Doric columns overlooks a dais with an arched reredos and an ornate Victorian-era pulpit. The Mt. Calvary congregation, from which at least five other Lutheran congregations in the county took their membership, predates the present church by a good eighty years, since a 1765 deed records the acquisition of three acres for the church. The previous church, a log building, at first served as a union church open to other denominations. A small cemetery with marble and limestone markers lies east of the church.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church", [Luray, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PG17.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 84-85.

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