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First Citizens Bank (Bank of Chatham)

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Bank of Chatham
1905, Frye and Chesterman. 1 S. Main St.

With full-height Ionic columns framing its entrance and supporting a pediment below a parapet, the former Bank of Chatham has the buff-colored brick favored early in the twentieth century. The bank features the era's popular thermal windows on its side elevation and an elaborate interior that includes a coffered ceiling with intricate friezes. Nearby at 2 N. Main Street, the small former Planters Bank (c. 1920) with its limestone facing and Corinthian columns exudes a grandeur that contrasts with the staid solidity of the Bank of Chatham. Main Street's other commercial buildings, mostly dating from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, are less elaborate two-story brick buildings with saw-tooth or corbeled brick cornices above store-fronts that in many cases have been altered.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Data

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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "First Citizens Bank (Bank of Chatham)", [Chatham, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PI3.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 361-362.

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