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Penn-Wyatt House

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1876; 1910–1915 modifications. 862 Main St.

This house combines the picturesque irregularity of an Italian Villa with a Second Empire mansard-roofed tower. The porch and the circular gazebo-like feature with a bellcast roof at one of its corners may have been added when modifications were made to the house in the early twentieth century. A shallow pediment on the porch that indicated the entrance to the house is decorated with low-relief classical motifs, a variation on a recurring Danville theme. The house's stuccoed walls are enlivened with quoins, a modillion cornice, and pressed-metal hood moldings over the windows, and the roof has polychrome, patterned slates and delicate iron cresting. Bold and unique, the Penn-Wyatt House, built for tobacco merchant James Gabriel Penn and his wife, Sallie Johnson, holds pride of place on a street of outstanding buildings. The house was sold at auction to Landon Wyatt in 1934. The carriage house dates to 1904.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Penn-Wyatt House", [Danville, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PI46.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 373-374.

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