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Emmanuel Episcopal Church

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1846. 2390 Emanuel Church Rd.
  • (Photograph by Mark Mones)
  • (Virginia Department of Historic Resources)
  • (Photograph by Mark Mones)
  • (Photograph by Mark Mones)
  • (Photograph by Mark Mones)

Emmanuel Church was constructed at about the same time as Belmead (PO15). Speculation that Belmead's architect, Alexander Jackson Davis, designed the church cannot be documented. It seems more likely that Cocke, a major donor to Emmanuel, designed the stuccoed brick building with Davis in mind. The small but stylish Gothic Revival church has stepped gable ends with corner buttresses capped by turrets terminating in octagonal caps with crockets. Shouldered buttresses separate the four windows on each of the building's sides and the double entrance doors are framed by recessed panels that are in turn flanked by tall, extremely slender windows. Inside, two aisles lead to a rostrum with the altar framed by a frontispiece. A door behind the altar opens to a polygonal vestry.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Emmanuel Episcopal Church", [Powhatan, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PO6.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 280-281.

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