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Scott County Courthouse

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1829, James Toncray, builder; 1920s, 1940s alterations; 1968 addition and remodeling, Milton P. Robelot. W. Jackson St. at Manville Rd.

Gate City's most prominent building, the Scott County Courthouse dominates the commercial area of Jackson Street. Erected by a builder of courthouses in Grayson (GY7), Wythe, Montgomery, and Floyd counties, it is one of only two Toncray courthouses to survive. Like his other courthouses, the Scott County courthouse has a two-story, Flemish bond brick central block flanked by slightly receding two-story brick wings, each originally with an entrance and window on the first story and two windows on the second. The building is crowned by an octagonal bellcast-roofed cupola with arched louvered vents and a ball finial. Dating to the 1920s are the remodeled entrance and the two-story Corinthian portico with a Palladian window in its pediment. Entirely unsympathetic to the courthouse are later twentieth-century additions that include a two-story brick structure (1940s) to the left and a brick addition (1968) to the right. Remodeling of the courthouse's interior has left little original fabric untouched.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Scott County Courthouse", [Gate City, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-SC1.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 497-497.

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