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Buchanan House

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c. 1900, Eleanor Sheffey Buchanan. 135 W. Strother St.

This Queen Anne house was designed by the wife of lawyer and state senator Benjamin Franklin Buchanan and built on a portion of the Sheffey estate. Buchanan's law office was housed in the east wing of the house. The two-and-a-half-story frame house is clad in weatherboards on the first story and decorative wooden shingles on the second. It is an irregular-shaped dwelling with a prominent asymmetrical front gable containing a Palladian window and diagonal boarding and decorative trusswork. An octagonal two-story tower rises at the southwest corner, and a porch with Tuscan columns on brick piers wraps around two sides of the house.

Also Queen Anne is the house (1911; 109 W. Strother) erected for H. B. Staley, owner of the Marion Roller Mills. The brick hipped-roof house has cross gables, bay windows, a wraparound porch with paired and tripled Ionic columns on brick piers, and a prominent front gable clad in wooden shingles.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Buchanan House", [Marion, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-SM10.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 460-461.

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