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Joseph Stamm Barn

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1902. 7955 County Rd. Y

Joseph Stamm built this bank barn to stable his horses. Most barns in this area were built of wood, but Stamm erected a sturdier stone barn. Stout timbers joined by wooden pegs frame the two-story building, and locally quarried fieldstones laid with generous amounts of mortar form the walls. On the west side, narrow doors surmounted by segmental-arched lintels opened from the stalls. Most of these doorways have been filled in, but their outlines remain. Above the stalls is a door into the haymow. Slits in the wall helped ventilate the loft and kept moist hay from combusting spontaneously. The arched window in the north gable end provided additional air circulation. At this north window we can see the pride Stamm took in his barn, for he gave it a decorative wooden arch with a stylized keystone and impost blocks. On the door at the northwest corner, a stone block has been carved with the image of a horse.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Marsha Weisiger et al.
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Citation

Marsha Weisiger et al., "Joseph Stamm Barn", [Lodi, Wisconsin], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WI-01-DA10.

Print Source

Buildings of Wisconsin

Buildings of Wisconsin, Marsha Weisiger and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2017, 432-433.

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