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Robert C. Byrd Technology Center (Whitecarver Hall)

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Whitecarver Hall
1911–1912, Holmboe and Lafferty. Circle Dr.

Standing at the entrance to the college campus, the original men's dormitory currently serves as the college's technology center, named for U.S. Senator Byrd. The original front of the three-story, cream-colored brick building now faces away from the campus entrance because of a roadway reorientation in recent years. Ionic pilasters and a pediment emphasize the three central bays of the sevenbay central block. Strangely, pilaster caps are at the top of the second-floor level, requiring them to support ungainly vertical sections of entablature that extend the full height of the third floor. This curious arrangement makes the third story appear to be an addition, but surviving blueprints prove that this is what the Clarksburg architects had in mind from the beginning. With nearby Withers Hall (1921), Whitecarver gives a good idea of the original look of the campus. Most newer buildings have not followed the examples they tried to set, more's the pity.

Writing Credits

Author: 
S. Allen Chambers Jr.
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Citation

S. Allen Chambers Jr., "Robert C. Byrd Technology Center (Whitecarver Hall)", [Philippi, West Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WV-01-BA5.1.

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