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Welch High School and Grade School

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1920, 1923–1925, Alex B. Mahood. 1938. Southeast side of Maple Ave., above intersection with Bridge St.

This large, U-shaped complex stands on a steep hillside overlooking Welch. Built of brown brick, it occupies the site of the city's first high school. To the right and left are similar buildings, each of four stories. The earliest, on the left, originally housed elementary and junior high school classes. The one on the right has a Temple-of-the-Winds Corinthian portico with Browns Creek District High School carved in the entablature. Above, sculpted statues of students flank a cartouche decorated with an open book containing words of wisdom. Both buildings have broad, slightly recessed central sections flanked by end pavilions, echoing the overall shape of the complex. Recessed between them, and not quite living up to the architectural standards they set, is the gymnasium, the last element constructed. In 1973 land for a consolidated high school was purchased, and the Welch High School was closed in 1978.

Writing Credits

Author: 
S. Allen Chambers Jr.
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Citation

S. Allen Chambers Jr., "Welch High School and Grade School", [Welch, West Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WV-01-MD17.

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