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Holyoke

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The county seat (1887, 3,746 feet) was named by the general superintendent of the Burlington Railroad for his son-in-law, Edward A. Holyoke. This division point on Frenchman Creek was laid out on a grid. Grain elevators are the skyscrapers in Holyoke, which is still focused on its main street, Interocean Highway (U.S. 385). The Burge Hotel (1912), 230 North Interocean Highway, has a huge stone fireplace and tablet honoring the “Knights of the Grip,” the traveling salesmen who spiced small-town life. A main street mansion converted to a nursing home has a large sign: “Love is Ageless. Visit Us.”

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel

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