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Harris Baking Company Office Building

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1936, Haralson and Mott. 114 W. Elm St.

A small, simple office building, this is the only Moderne design in Rogers. It was also the first office building in Rogers with air conditioning, casement windows, and windows that wrap around its corners, and the bakery (connected to the office) was the first with conveyor belts. Introducing all these firsts was the bakery’s owner, Earl Harris, who bought the Lane Hotel (BN21) in 1935. Originally the flat-roofed building, which is faced in stucco, was capped by a cornice composed of a narrow band of gold leaf, and gold leaf covered the company’s name that marches in raised letters across the facade. The entrance is at the northwest corner of the building.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Cyrus A. Sutherland with Gregory Herman, Claudia Shannon, Jean Sizemore Jeannie M. Whayne and Contributors
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Citation

Cyrus A. Sutherland with Gregory Herman, Claudia Shannon, Jean Sizemore Jeannie M. Whayne and Contributors, "Harris Baking Company Office Building", [Rogers, Arkansas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/AR-01-BN20.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Arkansas

Buildings of Arkansas, Cyrus A. Sutherland and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2018, 35-35.

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