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Library Park

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Mathews to Peterson sts. between Oak and Olive sts.

The new and old libraries and several pioneer structures enrich this park. The original Carnegie Library (1904, Albert Bryan) of rough-faced red sandstone from the Stout Quarry is now complemented by the boxy, cantilevered $1.4 million Fort Collins Public Library (1975, Alan Zeigel). The old library became the Fort Collins Museum, showcasing local history and a fine collection of Folsom points from the Lindenmeier site, 28 miles northwest of the city.

Library Park's Pioneer Courtyard contains three transplanted early-day log structures, as well as stone hitching posts and architectural bric-a-brac. The Antoine Janis Cabin (c. 1859), a hewn log cabin from Laporte, has been spruced up with a fine sandstone chimney and shake shingle roof. The Auntie Stone Cabin (1864) started out as the community's first private home and served as an officer's mess for the old fort, the town's first schoolhouse, and the home of the city's pioneer woman settler, Elizabeth Stone.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
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Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Library Park", [Fort Collins, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-LR12.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 230-230.

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