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Aspen Community Church (First Presbyterian Church, United Methodist Church)

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First Presbyterian Church, United Methodist Church
1891. 200 E. Bleeker St. (northeast corner of Aspen St.) (NR)

This two-story Queen Anne Style church has a prominent battered three-story bell tower carrying an enclosed shingled belfry with louvered lancets beneath a graceful bellshaped cap. Romanesque Revival detailing appears in walls of rough-faced sandstone from the Peach Blow quarries and large, radiating voussoirs. A truncated hipped roof has a dormer and parapeted gables extending above protruding bays on each street side, with a prominent round window on the entry facade. Above the ground-level offices and classrooms, the second-story sanctuary has semicircular pews with Neo-Gothic detailing like that in the wood-work and windows.

The church was built as the First Presbyterian Church by a congregation founded in 1886 by the Reverend H. S. Beavis. As Aspen shriveled to a town of only a few hundred, the Presbyterians and Methodists combined in 1920. Fourteen years later, a further consolidation led to its reorganization as the Aspen Community Church. This and St. Mary's Catholic Church, at 104 South Galena, are the last of Aspen's silver-age churches.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
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Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Aspen Community Church (First Presbyterian Church, United Methodist Church)", [Aspen, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-PT09.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 492-493.

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