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Residence

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1964, Hugh Newell Jacobsen. 2813 Q St. NW

The sight of this residence may produce a double take. Its western wing concludes a string of pleasant row houses dating from the 1880s. As an extension to the end house are an entrance hyphen, and, at first glance, a replica of the original house as the eastern wing. Here the basic form, openings, materials, and decorative flourishes have been carried over from one side of the site to the other. The new wing is not, in fact, a replica of the western block because the windows differ and the interior spaces were opened to provide dramatic deep spaces and fine views of the garden. In this project, the architect and review board sought relief from the pressure to provide creative modern designs for buildings in historic Georgetown by seeking solutions through the selective use of historical precedents. This residence thus became a precursor to the Postmodern buildings of the 1980s.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee
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Citation

Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee, "Residence", [Washington, District of Columbia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/DC-01-GT19.

Print Source

Buildings of the District of Columbia, Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 410-410.

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