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E. Paul du Pont House

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New Office
1890–1891. 1914. 204 Buck Rd., east of Greenville

The growth of the DuPont Company after the Civil War was symbolized by a big new headquarters building in High Victorian Gothic, across Buck Road from the family burying ground. When the office staff eventually moved to downtown Wilmington (see DuPont Building, WL32), that headquarters became the William K. du Pont house in 1902 and, after his death five years later, was radically altered into a Colonial Revival–style mansion by E. Paul du Pont. Here Paul built the prototype Du Pont automobile, a 1919 Model A, and oversaw the growth of Du Pont Motors until the Depression ruined his business in 1932. Only 547 Du Pont cars were produced, including the test car for the Model G (1928) now on display nearby in the barn at Eleutherian Mills (see CH15.6). President Franklin D. Roosevelt was received in the parlor at du Pont's home during a visit to Delaware.

Writing Credits

Author: 
W. Barksdale Maynard
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Citation

W. Barksdale Maynard, "E. Paul du Pont House", [Greenville, Delaware], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/DE-01-CH14.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Delaware

Buildings of Delaware, W. Barksdale Maynard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2008, 65-65.

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