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Hockessin Community Center (Hockessin School 107-C)

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Hockessin School 107-C
1920. 4266 Mill Creek Rd.
  • Hockessein Community Center (Hockessin School 107-c)

Like other African American schools in the state, the little brick Hockessin Colored School was funded by P. S. du Pont. In 1950, Sarah Bulah wanted her seven-year-old daughter, Shirley, a pupil here, to ride the bus to school, a privilege granted only to whites. Bulah turned to attorney Louis L. Redding, who filed suit demanding that Shirley be admitted to the nearby white school, Hockessin Elementary. This and a case from Claymont were decided in the plaintiffs' favor in 1952. Appealed to the United States Supreme Court, they became part of the famous Brown v. Board of Education case (1954)—its only component lawsuits in which a state court struck down segregation. After Brown ended segregation nationwide, School 107-C closed in 1959. It appears virtually unchanged today, but an addition is planned for its new use as a community center.

Writing Credits

Author: 
W. Barksdale Maynard
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Citation

W. Barksdale Maynard, "Hockessin Community Center (Hockessin School 107-C)", [Hockessin, Delaware], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/DE-01-MC3.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Delaware

Buildings of Delaware, W. Barksdale Maynard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2008, 166-166.

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