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University of Hawaii at Manoa

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1907 established. University Ave. and Dole St.

Boasting a 258.58-acre campus, the University of Hawaii was established as the College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts of the Territory of Hawaii in 1907. Manoa was selected as the location for the new school; however, a temporary campus was established at Young and Victoria streets until the Manoa campus lands could be secured. In 1911, the name of the school was officially changed to the College of Hawaii, and the following year, the college opened in Manoa. In 1920, the school attained university status.

Architecturally, the university grew as an eclectic hodgepodge of structures to accommodate growing needs. Some buildings, including two designed by such well-known architects as Edward Durell Stone (Biomedical Science Building, 1971) and Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (Holmes Hall, 1972), appear to reflect budgetary constraints.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Don J. Hibbard
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Data

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Citation

Don J. Hibbard, "University of Hawaii at Manoa", [Honolulu, Hawaii], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/HI-01-OA122.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Hawaii

Buildings of Hawaii, Don J. Hibbard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011, 152-152.

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