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Huttinglocker House

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1893–1895, George F. Barber and Company. 410 27th St.

George F. Barber and Company of Knoxville, Tennessee, were responsible for the design of many houses and other types of buildings throughout the Midwest, and especially in Iowa. Sometimes the designs came from the company's pattern books and mail-order plans, and on other occasions the firm was engaged to design individual dwellings, as was the case with the Huttinglocker house. Like most Queen Anne dwellings of the 1890s, this one is quite restrained (especially for Barber). The wide veranda projecting from the east and south sides of the house is, with its columns and gabled entrance, Colonial Revival. The solidity of the design is enhanced by the use of red stone and pressed brick for the first floor; the second and third floors rely much more on volumes and gables, rather than on any display of molded, sawed, or turned woodwork. Inside, there is a Colonial Revival fireplace in the parlor, and a richly decorated Queen Anne fireplace with scenes and designs in glazed brick in the entrance/stair hall.

Writing Credits

Author: 
David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim
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Citation

David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim, "Huttinglocker House", [Des Moines, Iowa], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/IA-01-CE170.

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