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Trier House

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1956–1958, Frank Lloyd Wright. 1967, Taliesin Associates Architects. 880 N.W. Beaver Dr.
  • Trier House

The plan of the Usonian Trier house is closely modeled after the exhibition house (1953) built on the site of the Guggenheim Museum in New York. 23 The original scheme for the Trier dwelling was for a concrete-block house, but this was changed at the request of the clients to a house built of larger than normal red brick laid with the usual Wrightian horizontal mortar grooves accentuated. The living wing of the flat-roofed dwelling has ceilings that are 10 feet, 8 inches high, while the height of the bedroom wing sinks down to a cozy 6 feet, 8 inches. In plan there is the usual Usonian central core of workspace (kitchen) and utility; the combined livingdining room extends to one side, and a bedroom to the other. The entry and carport project off the north side of the dwelling. Much of the interior furniture was designed by Wright and built by the owner. In 1967 Taliesin Associates Architects added a north wing to the house.

Notes

Mickunas and Zingsheim, 30.

Writing Credits

Author: 
David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim
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Citation

David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim, "Trier House", [Johnston, Iowa], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/IA-01-CE218.

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