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Eagle Point Park

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North end of N. 3rd St. at N. Stockwell Lane

Within the park situated on a cliff overlooking the Mississippi River are three structures of note. These are, first, a stone lookout tower (1937), a 35-foot-high double-tiered circular tower with crenellated walls. It poses like a folly in an eighteenth-century English garden, as a fragment of a ruined castle. The second is a lodge (c. 1913, c. 1935, and 1967), a stone and wood-clad recreation building situated on a stone podium. The single gabled roof with an extension at the lower pitch covers the entire building. The 1966–1967 changes designed by Phil Feddersen, like the WPA alterations of the thirties, have both respected and added to the lodge's successful rustic image. The third noteworthy structure is a foot bridge (c. 1937), a narrow, graceful stone pedestrian bridge that spans a small ravine. The walkway gently slopes down to the arched sections and then slowly rises on the opposite bank.

Writing Credits

Author: 
David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim
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Data

What's Nearby

Citation

David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim, "Eagle Point Park", [Clinton, Iowa], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/IA-01-ME106.

Print Source

Buildings of Iowa, David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 64-64.

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