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Old Ouachita National Bank

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1906, Drago and Smith. 106 St. John St.

Ouachita National Bank's first home is designed in the manner of a Roman temple, featuring a shallow portico with four fluted Composite columns on tall bases that rise the full height of the two-story building. The pediment projects forward from the entablature and, outlined with modillions and dentils, makes a dynamic conclusion to the building. Anthemia decorate the pediment at its crest and outer corners. Fluted pilasters are set between the round-arched entrance door and flanking windows, above which runs a Greek frieze. The bank's finely detailed facade, clearly influenced by the more elaborate manifestations of turn-of-the-twentieth-century Beaux-Arts classicism, is one of the highlights of Monroe's business district. The bank’s interior has been altered. In 1916, the discovery and exploitation of the Monroe Gas Field north of the city brought considerable wealth to Monroe and in 1920 the bank constructed a ten-story building next door to this building.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Karen Kingsley
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Data

Timeline

  • 1906

    built

What's Nearby

Citation

Karen Kingsley, "Old Ouachita National Bank", [Monroe, Louisiana], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/LA-01-OU4.

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