You are here

Circle Market (St. Bernard Market)

-A A +A
1932, Samuel Stone Jr.; 1966 additions; 2014 renovated, John C. Williams Architects. 1522 St. Bernard Ave.

This market occupies a corner site that as early as 1854 housed market structure. It is an eye-catching Spanish Colonial Revival design, with a covered arcade that curves around its St. Bernard Avenue facade and continues on the S. Claiborne Avenue side. The steel-framed building is covered in white stucco and has a red tile roof, ornamental parapet, and decorative iron grilles over the windows. The market’s tower and cupola are visible from 1–10, which in 1966 was built above S. Claiborne Avenue. The market was one of thirty-four that the City of New Orleans controlled and operated, one for every neighborhood and more than any other city in the nation. In 1941 the City dissolved the Department of Public Markets and began to sell the buildings; this one came into private hands in 1947. A few of the market buildings survive, most adapted for different uses, but this one and St. Roch (OR48) still serve as markets. The market closed in 2018.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas
×

Data

Timeline

  • 1932

    Built
  • 1966

    Additions
  • 2014

    Renovated
  • 2018

    Closed

What's Nearby

Citation

Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas, "Circle Market (St. Bernard Market)", [New Orleans, Louisiana], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/LA-02-OR43.

Print Source

buildings of new orleans book

Buildings of New Orleans, Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2018, 64-64.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,