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The Foley (Boston Sanatorium)

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Boston Sanatorium
191–251 River St.

In 1906 the city acquired this former private estate to construct a hospital for consumptives. The retirement home of John Connes, former California senator and close friend of Abraham Lincoln, still stands on the estate where it was used as a superintendent's residence (249 River Street). Maginnis and Walsh designed the original hospital buildings, constructed between 1907 and 1920, their major surviving work being the Tudor-style Administration Building, built in 1910. In 1928–1930 James Ritchie and Associates, the firm that designed most of the sanatorium buildings in the 1920s and 1930s, erected the additions to this building. The Nurses Home (1929, 247 River Street), an English Renaissance–style dormitory, best represents the contributions of James Ritchie to the complex.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "The Foley (Boston Sanatorium)", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-DR25.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 264-265.

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