You are here

Church of the Holy Spirit

-A A +A
1886, Rotch and Tilden; 1899, Ralph Adams Cram. 525 River St.

Architect Arthur Rotch's sister Annie led the efforts to build this church in memory of their father, Benjamin Rotch, originally a New Bedford Quaker. Although the Rotches lived across the river in Milton, they acquired a relatively inexpensive undeveloped site in the Mattapan section of Dorchester. The massive shingled tower, with rows of great louvered vents that impart an oriental flavor to the design, dominates the Latin cross plan, constructed of local puddingstone with half-timbering in the gable ends. Frederic Crowninshield, later director of the American Academy in Rome, designed the stained glass windows in the apse. Ralph Adams Cram, a draftsman in the Rotch and Tilden office at the time of the original construction, was hired to design the parish hall in 1909.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Church of the Holy Spirit", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-DR26.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 265-265.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,