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East Cambridge Savings Bank

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1931, Thomas M. James; 1976, Charles Hilgen-hurst Associates. 292 Cambridge St.
  • East Cambridge Savings Bank

Thomas M. James developed a national reputation for the design of Classical Revival banks, such as the Lechmere Bank at 225 Cambridge Street built in 1917. In contrast, his East Cambridge Savings Bank is exceptional for its use of Byzantine architectural motifs combined with Art Deco influences. New York sculptor Paul Fjelde created the bronze doors and the highly stylized interior and exterior carvings representing agriculture, industry, and commerce. In 1976 Warren Schwartz and Robert Silver, then of the firm Charles Hilgenhurst Associates, enhanced this small gem by moving one complete granite bay from the side to the front to create a portal for the curvilinear glazed addition.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "East Cambridge Savings Bank", [Cambridge, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-EC18.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 287-288.

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