You are here

Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

-A A +A
1874, Patrick W. Ford. 39 6th St.
  • Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Patrick W. Ford's work as a Catholic architect was over-shadowed by his more famous father-in-law, Patrick C. Keely. Ford's Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus bears a striking similarity to Keely's Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston (SE12; 1867–1875). The spires on the Keely church were never built, whereas those on Ford's smaller Sacred Heart church were completed, and then removed in 1961. The interior of the church suffered a fire in 1963, but the spectacular alabaster altar (installed in 1881) survived. Peter Paul Pugin, son of the famous English master of Gothic Revival, Augustus Welby Pugin, designed the altar, which was carved in Cheltenham, England, by R. L. Boulton and Sons.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus", [Cambridge, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-EC22.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 288-289.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,