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The Hamptons

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1984–1987, Robert A. M. Stern Architects. Hampton Rd.
  • The Hamptons

Six houses arranged along a cul-de-sac, the Hamptons evokes in name and appearance the Shingle Style resort architecture of the late nineteenth century for which the Long Island summer community is known. New York architect Robert A. M. Stern developed his reputation as the designer of houses for the wealthy but here provides a developer's variants at a slightly reduced scale. The work of American and English architects of the late nineteenth century—McKim, Mead and White as well as Richard, Norman Shaw—haunt these designs, each set on a generous landscaped lot. Wood shingled walls and roofs, porches and loggias, and eyebrow dormers and stair towers provide both variety and consistency throughout the neighborhood. Stern offers here a postmodern critique of the modernist residential developments for which Lexington is justifiably famous.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "The Hamptons", [Lexington, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-LX5.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 440-440.

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