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St. John the Evangelist Church

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1904–1912, Maginnis, Walsh and Sullivan; 1957, Maginnis, Walsh and Kennedy. 2254 Massachusetts Ave.

From its landmark polychromatic brick, stone, and terra-cotta campanile, the bells of St. John the Evangelist called to prayer Irish immigrants from the fifth of thirteen parishes formed to serve the vast influx of Catholic newcomers into Cambridge during the second half of the nineteenth century. Charles Maginnis modeled St. John after Italian Lombard architecture, with the twelfth-century church of St. Zeno in Verona in mind. Maginnis used an interior scheme here he originally intended for St. Catherine of Genoa Church in Somerville (SM5), being built simultaneously. When fire gutted the church in 1956, the successor firm designed the current interior and upper section of the facade.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "St. John the Evangelist Church", [Cambridge, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-NC7.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 359-359.

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