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Three-deckers, 73, 75, and 77 Farragut Road

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1908, Timothy J. Lyons.

An exuberant trio of three-deckers facing Pleasure Bay and Castle Island, these houses were designed by Timothy J. Lyons, a mason who may also have served as the builder. Their shingled facades ripple with animation, from the rounded parlor bays to the semi-octagonal entrance bays fronted by projecting porches with balustraded convex balconies on the second and third levels. The original owners were primarily Americans by birth whose parents were born in Germany, Ireland, Russia, Canada, and the United States. From two to six individuals inhabited each apartment in 1910. Born in Massachusetts of Irish parents, Lyons listed himself successively in censuses as a laborer, a brick mason, an architect, and a building inspector, ending his career in the School Buildings Department. He designed nearly sixty three-deckers between 1905 and 1915.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Three-deckers, 73, 75, and 77 Farragut Road", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-SB20.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 229-229.

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