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Samuel Stone House

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c. 1715?; 1884 and 1914 remodeled. 187 Pelham Island Rd.
  • Samuel Stone House

One of the earliest and most spectacular reuses of decorative building elements from another historic building can still be found on Pelham Island Road. In 1884, the owners of a fairly plain Georgian double-pile, central chimney farmhouse added the fluted pilasters and dentilled pediment that came with all the dentils from the eaves of the Oliver Wendell Holmes House, then being demolished in Cambridge. Inside, a mantel from the Holmes house was installed over the west chamber fireplace. Matching end piazzas, the pedimented dormers, and a connecting balustrade may also date to this period, but had certainly been added by 1914, when the old house was again remodeled for the unmarried granddaughters of Joseph T. Buckingham, founder of New England Magazine.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Samuel Stone House", [Wayland, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-WY2.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 464-464.

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