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HOGSHEAD

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Early 19th century. 43 Pinkney St.
  • (Lisa Pfueller Davidson and Catherine C. Lavoie)

This is a restored example of the frame Chesapeake dwellings built in Annapolis during the colonial period. Although evidence points to a construction date during the early nineteenth century, its modest two-room plan and gambrel roof configuration are reminiscent of the dwellings that once dominated the city’s architectural landscape. It speaks to the persistent use of this house form among the artisan and working classes long after Annapolis’s wealthier inhabitants constructed their fine Georgian, two-story brick houses. The interior of Hogshead consists of a hall-parlor plan with the larger hall heated by a fireplace; a winder stair appears in the smaller parlor leading to two rooms above. The kitchen, with its large cooking fireplace and beehive oven, is located in the basement. Hogshead is owned by Historic Annapolis and used to interpret the life of the city’s “lower and middling sort.”

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lisa Pfueller Davidson and Catherine C. Lavoie
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Citation

Lisa Pfueller Davidson and Catherine C. Lavoie, "HOGSHEAD", [Annapolis, Maryland], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MD-01-WS56.

Print Source

Buildings of Maryland, Lisa Pfueller Davidson and Catherine C. Lavoie. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2022, 63-63.

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